Tom Sito 11/2/16

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Tom Sito is our Chair and Professor of the John C Hench Division of Animation and Digital Arts at the School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California.

Tom Sito’s screen credits include the Disney classics The Little Mermaid (1989), Beauty and the Beast(1991), Aladdin (1992), The Lion King (1994), Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), Pocahontas (1995),Dinosaurs (2000) and Fantasia 2000. Animation World Network called Tom “one of the key players in the Disney Animation Revival” (January 2001). In 1995 he left a Disney directorship post to help set up the Dreamworks Animation unit. He worked on The Prince of Egypt (2001), Antz (1999), Paulie (1998), Spirit, Stallion of the Cimarron (2002), and was the storyboard supervisor for a time on the award winning filmShrek (2001).

Tom also helped animate the title sequence of City Slickers, the 1982 Emmy award-winning ABC specialZiggy’s Gift (1982), directed 22 hours of Saturday morning television, including Fat Albert, He Man and the Masters of the Universe, She-Ra, and numerous commercials. Tom co-directed the animation for Warner Bros. Osmosis Jones (2001) and did storyboards for Warners Bros. The Looney Tunes Movie (2003) and Fox’s Garfield (2004), Hop (2011) and Yogi Bear (2012).

Tom Sito has produced short films, Has taught animation at UCLA, CalArts, Woodbury College and SMC, and has written numerous articles for Animation Magazine and Animation World Network. He has lectured on animation at NYU, SVA, Carnegie Mellon,CalArts, AFI, SCAD, BYU, University of Washington, Microsoft, Woodbury College, Capilano College, VFS and Sheridan College in Canada, EURO-CARTOON, the Ecole Du Grand Gobelins, L’Ecole Georg Melies in Paris and Cartoon Masters in Erfurt Germany, ICA Channel 4/MESH in London, The Animation Academy of Viborg Denmark, The Filmakademie Stuttgart, The Animar Festival in Palma Majorca, The Beijing Film Academy and the Yomiuri New Media Forum in Tokyo.

He is President-Emeritus of the Hollywood Animation Guild Local 839 Hollywood and is vice president of the International Animator’s Society (ASIFA/Hollywood). He is a member of the Motion Picture Academy, the National Cartoonists Society and Hollywood Heritage.

He is the author of four books. His first book, Drawing the Line: the Untold Story of Animation Unions from Bosko to Bart Simpson,(2006) was praised by the London Review of Books and Princeton University. His latest, Moving Innovation, a History of Computer Animation, has recently been released from MIT Press.

In 1998 he was named in Animation Magazine’s list of “the 100 Most Important People in Animation.”

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36 thoughts on “Tom Sito 11/2/16

  1. I found Tom Sito’s stories very inspiring and as a glimpse into a professional and established animator’s career. Sitos stories are very down to earth and expressed vividly as he experienced them. The advice that really stuck with me from Sito’s presentation is to work hard even if the project is a complete flop because you never know who will be watching. Also, working on a job once must consider three things the career experience, reputation, and money. This way one can gain “armor” to gain important assets for future projects to become a trusted/ credited animator. Overall, i am very happy to have Sito as our head chair/ professor at this amazing school. Being under his wing will be a phenomenal nourishing experience.

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  2. Like many of my classmates, I grew up watching the Disney classics (I still have them on VHS) that Tom Sito worked on. It was really refreshing to hear someone who has had such an illustrious career in animation talk so candidly about his experience in the industry. His presentation spanned the highs and lows of the industry, from humorous moments with colleagues and glamorous awards presentations, to the reminder that Hollywood is a business that doesn’t promise you job security and still has a ways to go in the realm of equality.

    One of the points that really resonated with me was Tom’s advice on building the right to have influence. That comes with reputation. Reputation is earned when you take the work you are given and you produce incredible results, regardless of how the project as a whole turns out. Talented people end up working on crappy films because the reality is they are people just like everyone else who needs to earn a paycheck. You never know who is watching, so always do your best. Once you prove you are valuable, then people will listen to you, and you can “make noise”.

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  3. I like the fact that Tom revealed us true funny moments from his experience in the industry, it more or less made the industry seems less stressful and scary. I am inspired by when he said to watch a film for different reasons, to really figure out the reason why you like this film, which is a great way to figure out where your interests, specialty and the art direction you would like to go into. I like that he said to keep on learning new art styles while working on other people’s projects, even if you have already have a set art style. I believe that even if you are in the industry, even for a long time, there are always things to learn and new stuff coming out every week. To be inside the system but still with an open eye for different exciting opportunities, to try out different things, will be my goal as well.

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  4. Tom is such an awesome and talented guy, and I’m really glad we have him here at USC. I think it’s great to have someone in who can talk about not just their own artistic insight, but insight into how the industry works as well. To top it all off, he was critical to the making of several films that I absolutely adored as a child.

    However, there was one thing he said that bothered me a little. When asked about how we as students can help to change the current lack of diversity in Hollywood, his answer was that change is really only going to happen when people who are already valued in the industry demand it. While this might be an accurate statement, it didn’t really address the spirit of the question. It’s a bit like someone asking how to get into a locked room, and telling them to wait for someone else to come along and open it for them. It isn’t exactly an encouraging sentiment for students who are part of groups that are currently severely underrepresented and given fewer opportunities to make it in the industry. I want to know what they can do to make sure that they become people with the influence to change things in the industry. Are there organizations they can become a part of that will help them find employment? Are there groups trying to put pressure on the industry to make changes that we can join? Are there things we could be doing through USC that might help?

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    1. Hi Erik- there are some ways students can mobilize to change the industry. For example, the Geena Davis institute works towards more representation of women both on and off-screen in the industry (http://seejane.org/) They came to USC at one point. Their website offers advice on how to get involved.

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    2. Really love the way you put this locked room analogy, Eric. I’m with you. While it’s certainly important for people with access to make noise and make change just as Tom did, I’m hungry for an expanded conversation. I commend Tom for his contributions and I want to talk about what’s next. I’ve been meaning to check out the Geena Davis Institute and just signed up to “advocate” for them. It can be so hard to keep track of everything going on on campus so let’s make a pact to keep each other posted on any related talks/events we hear about on campus!

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  5. Tom Sito’s stories, in addition to being entertaining, were insightful on how the animation industry works and how far it has advanced. On the lighter side, his stories about his colleagues are a lesson that even as an animator go on to make a living, they still maintain their sense of humor and passion for their work. On the more serious side, I liked his advice on being realistic about getting into the animation industry. It served as a reminder that animators should not get too idealistic about a freedom to pursue art, but at the same time not be too jaded to carry on. As the entertainment industry is a business, one must be realistic about their goals and know when to stand for their art at the same time. Indeed, connections and who you know seem to be important to furthering your animation career, especially in animation. I suppose I should get cracking on fostering those connections I made! I am thankful for Tom Sito’s time, and what lessons about the animation industry I can gleam from his fun stories.

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  6. ** WOULD LOVE TO HEAR Y’ALL WEIGH IN ON THIS IDEA:

    Artist, animator, director, historian, and labor rights activist?! I am constantly learning new things about Tom’s career and find it to be an endless source of inspiration. He’s done so much! I’m really impressed by his breadth of work and so thankful to have the opportunity to study under him.

    I’ve found myself thinking a great deal about his lecture over the past few days. Coming into USC, my understanding of the film industry has been based mostly in independent film and criticism. I know that Hollywood is a business and I can accept that in business the bottom line is the bottom line, but I can’t help but feel that the industry is going about business in a way that is wrong and detrimental. Sure you’ve got to be smart about finances but what about when you focus too obsessively on this aspect? Many people harbor romantic associations for the film industry, and I feel very confident that these associations are born just as much from the glitz and glamour of Hollywood as they are from the artistry and cultural capital of cutting edge films. When you neglect one of these components how can you end up with anything beyond a hollowed-out shell of an institution? I’m very curious to see where the industry is heading. When I see outspoken film critics like Manohla Dargis earning a Pulitzer for her work, and filmmakers like George Lucas, Brian de Palma and Steven Spielberg speaking poorly of the industry, I can’t help but feel like there is an overwhelming push for things to change. I wonder: how do you measure that change? Hearing Tom
    talk about national film boards in other countries made me wonder the extent to which Hollywood can support art. It certainly has in the past, but maybe those days are over and it’s time for streaming services or someone/something else to take the stage.

    Christine always emphasizes how much bigger animation is than just Hollywood so what does it mean to make yourself valuable to them and what is the point of doing this? I think I’m going to interpret this point from Tom as “be the best artist/storyteller/filmmaker you can be and let your craft come first.” With films like “Ghost in a Shell” and “Doctor Strange” casting white actors (Scarlet Johanson & Tilda Swinton) in place of Asian actors, Hollywood has proved its values to be backwards and damaging. For this reason, I struggle with the idea of using this value system to make change happen. I’d love to expand on this idea more and hear some arguments from the other side. No question Hollywood needs to change, but perhaps there are things I’m failing to consider in my conceptualization of “making oneself valuable.”

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    1. I agree that Hollywood could use a shakeup. Like Tom mentioned, the success of “Black Lives Matter” and “Oscars so White” did have a profound affect on the Academy. When people make their voices heard, change can happen. It is never easy, but I do think the Geena Davis Institute pressured Pixar to hire more female story artists (such as our alum Valerie LaPointe.) Sometimes the industry has to be told when they make bad decisions- like hiring white actors in Asian movies, as you point out.

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    2. Well, was he saying that we need to adhere to the current value system to produce change? I interpreted Tom’s comments to be that we need to be inside the system to initiate change, not necessarily that we need to share the same values…

      I’d like to hear your definition of “value system”, as I think my definition might differ from yours, before I respond further. Thanks!

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  7. It was interesting to hear Tom’s career and his insight in the industry. I can see that he is passionate and talented in what he does. Yet it also made me more confident that I personally wouldn’t want to work directly in the Hollywood entertainment business. It made me a bit sad during seminar how we were discussing how US doesn’t provide much funding for short independent films. I notice after Tom gave the comment how it’s difficult to change the industry unless you’re working within made many of my classmates and me feel bit uneasy. Goes back to Erik’s entry metaphor how “. It’s a bit like someone asking how to get into a locked room, and telling them to wait for someone else to come along and open it for them.” We all want to be successful animators yet also want to have a sense of artistic freedom. Feel like there is a lot of conflicting emotions going on.

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  8. As a person who have strong curious and interesting to Character animation and the operation of the Hollywood’s animation industry, Tom’s speech is very helpful and give me many inspiration. I want to say, even I saw Who framed Roger Rabbit many years ago, but when Tom show that part to us, I am still amazed by how gorgeous animation they made. Especially when I am now working for Eric’s fundamental animation class, I know how hard it is to use that imagination and exaggeration when you let your character to perform. It notice me that how many road I need to walk before I got that high place. Also, Tom’s sharing about how to gain the reputation and how to be a leader of the team is also very useful for clearing my mind to push forward my dream, to be a director. But also from Tom’s history, I am also very clear that no matter how success a man is, it is a accumulation of little success and many strive. I will keep going!

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  9. Tom Sito basically established what I’ve always suspected: “The Lion King” is the best animated film ever made. Done.

    Beyond that, it was great to hear Tom speak about his various experiences and to listen his stories and his advice, as well as the advice of other animators. I especially enjoyed hearing about Tom’s approach to a job, as in whether the position provides an adequate benefit, be that in the form of valuable experience, an opportunity to establish/enhance one’s reputation, or money, pure and simple. I also appreciated learning about the animation guild, as I am keenly interested in the business/managerial aspect of animation. I look forward to future speakers who will also touch on the less creative side of the animation industry, as I believe that it is imperative that artists have the tools needed to survive in a world where a strong portfolio is just one aspect of a fulfilling career.

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  10. Honestly Tom Sito was one of the reason I choose to come this school. He is such a nice person and with all his experience he is so humble and welcoming. I enjoyed his presentation and like other times it was very nice to hear Tom tell stories. What I found interesting about Tom is his vast knowledge about different things that he sometimes implemented in his works.

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  11. I was one of the kids who grew up watching and was influenced by Disney Classics but how many of those kids will have an opportunity to actually study with those people behind all the fun in those masterpieces. I am really grateful to have To,m Sito as one of our professors here in USC.

    Aside from being such a great animator, writer and director who has spent years working in the animation industry with so many big studios, Tom Sito is a very good story teller. To be able to be a good story teller, one must has stories to tell, and Tom has countless of them. He always shares interesting and enjoyable stories from his own working experience and his aspect of life. I can sit down and listen to his stories all day.

    I really appreciate the thoughts that he mentioned in the seminar about weighting between experience, reputation and money. I think this is the problem that everyone of us will be facing once we finish with the school and start to enter the real working life. Time will helps us get through that problem and it will become an experience, which will become one of our endless stories that we will be sharing to others along our journey in this path.

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  12. It’s great to have faculty like Tom with so much experience in the animation industry. I thought it was inspiring when he explained his connection to Muybridge and that we are part of that passing of info. I also forgot how funny Osmosis Jones was and find myself wondering why briefs are unacceptable in PG films.
    When I was a child the Roger Rabbit short that Tom showed with Baby Hewey would play at the beginning of Honey I Shrunk the Kids, a film I watched constantly at a young age. I can’t tell you how much this film influenced me, but it did and mostly in how I view hospitals. The process of seeing it during seminar and now knowing one of the animators was a small full circle moment for me.

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  13. According to the speech, Tom said that he is connecting us with the masters. When I heard that line, it really encourage and brought me to a new level of seeing things. Tom is a truly fantastic person and really good animator. The career of him is so amazing that we can hear that for a day long and they are so many interesting stories in it. To hear from him is a great honor itself, and getting advise is even better and beyond imagination. “When you see something you really like and inspired you, watch it several times, slow it down, frame by frame”. It really useful because I’m using this all the time and it really works. His opinion about style is also inspiring that we can not limit ourselves in a circle of set style, while we should keep learning and trying new things, getting inspired and learning from others. A great way of thinking and learning is like a strong body, only when you having a strong body, then you can carry all those techniques as armor and swipe the industry with your own work and power. The whole speech means a lot to me. Thank you!

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  14. It’s always so much fun to listen the stories that Tom has. I was encouraged and inspired when he mentioned the connections between him and masters – it makes me think I’m also connecting with this masters.
    The seminar was not only full of interesting stories but also full of his useful opinions and information. It was very good to hear about this industry, animation guild, and three things to consider- money, reputation, and experience. I made me think about the future ahead of me.
    Thank you Tom for sharing your great stories!!

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  15. I’m really glad that we have Tom as our chair. He is always so nice to share experiences to us not only the animation experiences also the industry experiences. He is so talented that he involved in tons of amazing animation film. When I meeting with him, he helped a lot on my storyboard of my own project. I learned a lot. His speech was funny, he is always a natural story teller. From him, I learned if you wanna drawing a convincing performance, you need to observe people, and you need to act as your character and understand the emotion, don’t just use imagination. And animation is a way to show people what you think, is not just telling. Thanks Tom, I really appreciate that we have you here!

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  16. Tom is full to the brim with stories. A conversation with him is an ever-unfolding adventure into the depths of history and behind the scenes of the animation industry. This time around, his stories led to some pretty dark places, particularly about the lack of opportunity and open sexism a Disney in the early decades. It was pretty horrifying to hear about the goings on then. You can chalk it up to the dismissive statement, “it was just a different time.” but that diminishes the robust institution of misogyny not only embedded in our industries but embedded in our entire culture. Yesterday was a sad display of this issue. Tom suggested solving this problem from within the system and I understand that, but I feel like playing along until you’re safe to voice dissent will only continue to perpetuate the injustices. I stand in solidarity now.

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  17. You can tell that Tom is truly a great story teller. All of the moments he told us about, whether it be work flow in the industry or problems social dynamics within a work space, had rich stories to them. It makes me feel like part of the experience while listening to him speak. I think one point that stuck out to me a lot was his comment about making change within the company. It is much easier to change the direction of a company or field if you are working with other people who have a big influence. However I also feel a lot of conflict with that statement because sometimes getting into that circle means people outside of that circle no longer trust you. I hope the opinions of this generation can continue to help Disney into the best direction.

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  18. It’s no wonder Tom has such a successful career in animation – he truly knows how to entertain an audience!! I haven’t shared this with Tom yet, but his film Osmosis Jones, was the film that inspired my interest in science. I’ve tried for years (and more intensely since I’ve been at USC) to mold science and art together to create something similar to Osmosis Jones that would inspire other children’s interest in science as well. Unfortunately what I hadn’t realized until the lecture, was the true brilliance of Osmosis Jones actually had very little to do with science itself, and more to do with twisting a traditional story formula to translate it into the world of science. How could I have not seen that artists and animators are the true geniuses (at least in this case :)). As I analyze and ramble about these thoughts/ feelings, I realize this is a testimony to how influential animations are to children and adults. Tom summed it up perfectly. “[In story you should] think about how to personify things in different ways.”

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  19. It is always entertaining to hear Tom Sito speak about anything! Not only did I learn a lot about animation and the industry from him, but I also learned a lot of history, too. I appreciate Tom’s honesty about the animation industry and the fact that he will share stories that you wouldn’t hear about in a book. Tom is very inspiring, but also very real about the industry in the fact that it is an industry. Yes, we have talent and bursting amounts of creativity, but it also comes down to how much money will a film make and how much can we make from toys and merchandise and so on, so that can be a little depressing. I have experienced it and it doesn’t feel great, but life goes on and you find better things to work on, or at least something to work on.

    I also like the advice he gave for young animators concerning how much a job will pay. I do agree with him about how much experience and how much you will learn on a job. When I got my first job, I was trying to learn everything I could, and I did. I learned very quickly. I also worked my butt off, like Tom said, you never know who is watching. And hopefully, some day I will get called back.

    When I think about it, Tom contributed a great deal to my childhood and the films he worked on gave me wonderful childhood memories. I hope to some day be a part of something that will do the same for others and maybe inspire a kid or two to pursue animation as a career 🙂

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  20. This show is really cool. Because before I studied in our campus I already knew Tom Sito. So I was so proud of myself to study animation in School of Cinematic Arts. He is a very brilliant person. He is one of the One Hundred Most Important People in Animation. I bought the book “ Drawing the Line: The Untold Story of Animation Unions from Bosko to Bart Simpson ” few years ago. It still on my bookshelf now. I love it very much. And the short film he showed us was pretty cool. I am a big fun of The Lion King. I watched this movie again and again. He is a really successful animator. All in all, thanks for sharing.

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  21. One of the things that one always hear about Tom Sito is how many stories he have, how funny they are and how into the industry and general environment they can immerse you. But also, there’s something even more interesting about his trajectory: Is not only about his single career, but also about the career of his fellow animators, his colleagues, and the work he has done for helping other animators to find in their craft a way of living. And as he might not have so many funny or interesting stories about that particular part of his career, I think that part is actually one of the most important because it has repercussions way beyond his personal trajectory.

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  22. We are lucky to have Tom Sito here with us. He is a great experienced animator and a professor full of lots of great stories. I enjoy his endless stories while he worked in those important and amazing projects such as Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast. He is a very good storyteller that can attract the audience and convince people successfully. Most important of all, he is a really nice person. He reminds us again and again how important it is to have each other in school right now. If we are staying in the industry, we will have to possibility to work with each other in the nearly future. No one wants to work with someone who is hard to get alone with, no matter how talented the person is.

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  23. He is one of legendary in Animation industry and I am glade that I could see his presentation. I can barley understand how much experiences he has had since he stared Animation. His stories that has been shown to a lot of children in the past are still introducing to new generation of kids. Moreover, I want to talk about Little mermaid. It is one of my favorite Disney Animation (I even sing the song Part of your world in karaoke all the time) . I had a chance to watch it again in the theater. From the moment, I could see many things that I have not seen before. Not only the beauty of story and art work, but also the details of each character’s personalities. It is amazing there are still many things that we can learn form the work.
    I wish I was in the time when Tom made Little mermaid.

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  24. Tom Sito gave such a great presentation. He is so easy to talk with. The Stories keep flowing! I love that Tom’s experience in the business began with animation. His thirst for knowledge is a great inspiration. What a great beginning of work and mentors he had as well. So grateful that he is “paying it forward” as the saying goes to all of us here at USC. He shared a few images taken with his mentors. The image of Tom Sito with Shamus Culhane shares that Tom has really stayed true to his style in facial hair even through the years! Love it.

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  25. I really adore Tom, and his lecture shows us why he is our Chair. He has a lot of experience in animation, but also a lot of interest in the industry’s history (he has written books on it 😉 ). I love that he loves this industry so much he wants to know everything about it’s past and how it came to be, even the darker side he isn’t afraid to shed light on. I will admit I think it would have been horrifying being a woman in animation in the past. I’m stubborn, so I would have probably done it anyways. But the idea of putting pins in a bra to keep from getting grabbed is both genius and somewhat appalling. That someone had to got to that length is sad, but that she was so innovative to defend herself is something I admire. It makes me glad that women in these times had so much back bone, but at the same time sad because I wonder what art we might have in our world if the women who were equally good to men were given the same opportunities to create. I wonder that for our present as well. The more and more time goes on, the more I really respect the work that is made but at the same time I feel there’s voices missing that shouldn’t be. And we all miss out because of that.

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  26. Tom Sito is like the Forrest Gump of Animation: he knows everyone, has been and continues to go to truly great places, and has an abundance of incredible stories. On top of that, he’s super talented to boot. I unfortunately was out sick and missed this seminar, and it sounds like his discussion turned to really important topics, such as the lack of women in this field and what it was like when he first started. Things have slowly been changing for the better, but there is definitely still a long way to go. I’m glad he also touched upon how every artist should strive to keep learning and using new techniques and styles. The goal should definitely be to always improve, and never settle for good enough. (Or at least that’s in my opinion.) There should never be a ‘this is as good as I’m going to get’ moment, where you stop seeking improvement. Ideally, you’ll still be working towards being the best artist possible up until you kick the bucket! Or have arthritis and seek other ways to create art. Anyway, this is taking an odd turn.

    I’m very thankful for Tim’s time and his guidance along the way here at USC!

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  27. I am glad that Tom can come and give us an inspiring speech. He always shares stories and ideologies in very interesting and relaxing way which can also let people easier to understand difficult concepts at first moment. For sure, it is most important and significant talent to be a successful and brilliant animation artist who needs to tell story in comprehensive and humorous way. With experienced and insightful vision from working in the industry, he pinpoints that it is critical to have both of wisdom in socializing and concentration on creating. Both of these factors will really influence the way you want to go and the world you want to construct.

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  28. I enjoyed Tom Sito’s presentation so much.
    I know he is a very important person in animation field, and his presentation is full of his passion for animation.. and his stories inspires us very much.
    Disney animations were my childhood, and I watched his animations, and I’m so happy that Tom Sito is our chair.

    It is very important for me that animator him/herself is attractive, and experiecnces so many things in person, and have intellect. Tom Sito has wonderful personality and builds good relationship with people, which I want to also learn about him.

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  29. Like many of my classmates, I grew up watching the Disney classics (I still have them on VHS) that Tom Sito worked on. It was really refreshing to hear someone who has had such an illustrious career in animation talk so candidly about his experience in the industry.I am glad that Tom can come and give us an inspiring speech. The seminar was not only full of interesting stories but also full of his useful opinions and information. It was very good to hear about this industry, animation guild, and three things to consider- money, reputation, and experience. I am thankful for Tom Sito’s time, and what lessons about the animation industry I can gleam from his fun stories.

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  30. I’m really glad that I come to USC. Before studying abroad, I was anxious because I don’t know what comes next after living life in this totally different culture. Then I ‘ve already lived here for almost three month, I love this place, love this school. I met lots of talented artists here and also great teacher.
    The speech Tom Sito gave us was also inspiring. He shared us about his animation career and his works. Also, He help me to figure out the questions I always had in my mind, which is what is the priority when choosing a job. He said experience is the first one and the last one is pay.

    “No matter how lousy your project is, do your best. Because you never know who’s watching.”

    I enjoyed today’s speech and also learned a lot from Tom Sito.

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  31. I was really appreciated that Tom briefly show us his career path and his personal stories. He is such a humble and nice person that we could learn so many stuff from him. The thing he mentions that what is the priority when choosing a job really inspired me a lot , to consider- money, reputation, and experience. That will make me think a lot in the future, Thank you Tom!

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  32. “Annual Tom workshop”. He is a living animation history textbook ,I like his traditional cartoon style, especially the short film from “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” , is the best timeing 2D animation I’ve ever seen. I benefited from Tom said in a quotation, I can not repeat the original words, like: “if you only complain out side of the industry, you will change nothing”

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