Adam Burton (Maxwell Atoms) 9/7/16

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(aka Adam Burton)

Maxwell Atoms is the creator of Cartoon Network’s “The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy”, “Evil Con Carne”, and “Underfist”. He was also the Executive Producer of Disney’s “Fish Hooks”, and has written, storyboarded, and designed for numerous other animated TV shows. When he’s not working, he gets all fidgety and weird and hangs out with his dog Rinjin (who is, sadly, not allowed to consume burritos in real life.)

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38 thoughts on “Adam Burton (Maxwell Atoms) 9/7/16

  1. Adam Burton’s stories on how he made it into the entertainment industry was very insightful. It was very inspiring to see how Billy and Mandy evolved from a school project into a successful TV show. Burton explained really well on how to conceive a project from an idea and how limitations challenge an animator. Burton follows his passion even if it involves leaving a well-known studio. With social media and mobile apps we are in an era where the internet can really expand an artist work and give opportunities to fund small projects without working for a large studio. Burton is an artist who knows his media and understood the entertainment business as he worked with large studios. Despite limitations Burton is following his passion and creating work that truly makes him happy.

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  2. Adam gave us some good insights into the world of pitching to networks. I really enjoyed seeing his developed storyboard pre-viz, but more than anything else I loved his new project involving puppets. Truly awesome. It’s great that he was inspired by Cormac McCarthy, one of my all time favorite authors, and I think it’s very funny to twist the depressing aspects of post-apocalyptic depression into comedy.
    I completely agree that the cultural climate in television is becoming weirdly conservative. It’s like there’s a highly strict and intelligent mom-bot out there censoring everything that we shoot into our eyelids. I can see how this can be a good thing for children, but there’s something about it that makes me want to get even weirder and obnoxious with my own work. The world is becoming very sensitive and I’m waiting for the next rebellion.
    I hope Adam’s project is picked up by Netflix or Hulu, or even better–the devil in commercialism: Amazon. Then maybe I can track him down and convince him to let me operate one of the puppets on his miniature set.

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  3. Billy and Mandy is one of my favorite shows in Cartoon Network, so does The Fish Hooks! It’s glad to have Adam Burton here with us tonight. It’s amazing that he’s already had the idea and the first draft of characters of Billy and Mandy while he was in school. I guess that’s one of the reasons why this piece is so fun because he does love the characters.

    The pitch process and the story reel are valuable for us as well. You have to make the whole world complete and convincing, so that everything will have the chance to work. But sometimes the great ideas don’t mean it will get pitch, either. Just trust yourself and there’s always another chance! Dead Meat looks fun and ambitious! Wish we will have the chance to watch the whole film someday!

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  4. Something curious about studying cinematic arts in the USC, is that even the classes or the topics that are not aligned with my particular professional interest, end up being very appealing to me, because in some level, sometimes in a very visceral/childhood memory level, they spark some interest. This was the case with Adam Burton.

    Adam’s trajectory seems very distant to the trajectory I’d like to achieve, but that didn’t keep me from enjoy his talk. My interest began with the most naïve motivation “He’s the creator of Billy and Mandy, and he worked in the old Cartoon Network!” and as the talk developed my motivation became more complex, as he revealed the vicissitudes of working in a big studio, the relationship with the idea he developed during his college years and finally sold to Cartoon Network to see it become a reality at the price of not owning it anymore and the struggle of working in a certain type of studio and the adventure of doing his own feature film with puppets. As with the past lecturer, I had this amazing feeling of openness from Adam, that spanned through all the conference from the screening of his first vision of Billy and Mandy from college years until the screening of the animatic of the project he’s working right now.

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  5. I appreciated hearing about Adam Burton’s various experiences in the television realm of animation given the breadth of his roles, from storyboarding for “Cow and Chicken” to creating and leading “The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy”. It was especially instructive to learn his approach to creating a pitch bible, as well as how the industry, and a few specific studios, has changed over the years. However, while it was great to hear about the various aspects of working in television, what was most striking was Adam’s positive attitude in the face of difficulties. Despite several unexpected layoffs and rejections, Adam continued to create, refine, and share his ideas with those around him. His endurance and adaptability are great reminders that animators, like the art they create, must constantly evolve in order to both survive and thrive in our constantly changing culture.

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  6. I appreciate Adam Burton sharing his prospective on animation television. It was helpful how he gave the class some insight on constructing animation bibles and sharing his opinion on animated television verse movie industry. Adam has such a great energy with such a distinct laugh. I grew up watching Billy and Mandy, so it is interesting and refreshing how I felt I was able to connect the relation of Adam’s character with his animation work. I admire how Adam continues growing as the industry continues to evolve. Despite some downfalls and rejections, Adam continues to create work. When he feels overwhelmed from the industry, he decides to pursue a kick-starter campaign to fund his own full-length animated film. I hope I will be able to watch Adam’s puppet animation feature soon in the future!

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  7. It was the most interesting to see how the characters can be so alive, with their personalities and characteristic so clearly defined in an animatic. The drawings were simple as well as the movements, but the story immediately draws us in because it was believable (in a way that both the story and the characters could really stand on its own). I believe that this was due to endless passion for developing action/comedy cartoons plus many years of industrial experiences, Adam was able to create and successfully pitch his many projects. Also the fact that he was able to carry his characters Bill & Mandy through all these different projects and just kept on making them more interesting, and more complete than before is extremely intriguing. Although as a more commercial/industrial animator that works mainly on major TV shoes, he still thought of this as a form of art. He cared about the work but not that much about the business aspect of it. He evolved with time but still reflected in his work his original thoughts and interests. I thought of this a great attitude while sort of floating in-between the artistic community & the industry.

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  8. I appreciated Adam Burton’s prospective in the animation industry. I love the attitude that he shared with pitching work and fulfilling the job. I frame his attitude as: a laugh, a smile, and stubborn determination to make new edgy work. His unique sensibility with design, animation, storytelling and comedy are great. I am not as familiar with his past shows I have to admit, but I love this new direction he is taking with his most recent stop motion idea. I can’t wait to see more.

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  9. Adams’ work surely blow my mind, not only because the outstanding animation frame, but also the original sound and voice cover that he did for his own film. That inspired me so much cuz I actually share the same idea. However, I always doubt that if the industry got that kind of openness and in fact the answer is yes as long as you got the real talent. Im sure that it’s base on a great gift in visual and sound even acting skills, but a great deal of practice and long way of effort is also necessary. According to the lecture, I feel the industry is so small and the people in it are so gifted. That encourages me to work harder and dream bigger to explore what I can do and what I do well. Thanks for the great inspiration!

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  10. I was all about cartoons as a kid too. I grew up on the shows that were being made when Adam was entering the industry. I definitely remember the ‘What A Cartoon’ series of shorts that ‘The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy’ was a part of. It was such a strange show (I thought so even back then). Putting Adams smiling face with this production so many years later though makes me feel nostalgic about it.

    There is this common theme that tends to creep up every time we have a career industry animator present, the volatility of the industry. Some people only mention it subtly but it’s always there. Being an animator is difficult enough without all the hubbub from suits with no empathy. I wonder why there are so many issues in the professional world for TV animators. All that aside, Adam proved that it can be navigated with persistence and a positive outlook. His new puppet film looks really fun and interesting. I’m excited to see what he has in store for us next.

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  11. There are presentations that afterwards, you feel really inspired and ready to go MAKE stuff. I felt that way when I left the seminar with Adam Burton, aka Maxwell Atoms. He has such a positive demeanor, and you can tell he really loves what he does and the work he creates. I enjoyed seeing his student short about Billy and Mandy, and how those characters progressed over time and made it into prime time on Cartoon Network! I also thought it was really informative when he discussed creating pitch bibles and making story reels to present. He has a very ‘can-do’ attitude, which I found incredibly refreshing. This industry can be tough and sometimes I feel like it can kind of beat people down. I didn’t get that sense at all with Atoms, instead I felt like if something didn’t work out, he’d shake it off and move on to the next passion project and just keep creating work that he believes in. Which is especially evident with ‘Dead Meat’; I’m really looking forward to keeping track of his progress on that and seeing it when it’s done. I wish there was a way we could still support the project, like when it was on Kickstarter!

    Also, the story reel he showed us of ‘Meow Meow and Bow Wow’ (-my apologies if I got that title wrong-) was amazing. So funny and well done with the cutting, timing, gags, voices, drawings… it was fantastic. It had everything that inspired me to work in the animation industry to begin with, and all the elements that attracted me to becoming a story artist. While watching the reel, I had that feeling again of ‘that’s why I’m here, that’s what I want to do!’

    To tag on to what XIaobo Ma said above, thank you for the great inspiration!!

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  12. I think the most inspiring thing about Adam Burton, AKA Maxwell Atoms, is his amazingly positive attitude. He is exactly the kind of person that I hope the animation industry is filled with; someone that absolutely loves what they do with every fiber of their being and wants everyone else to share in their passion.

    I grew up watching Cartoon Network, and I remember absolutely loving The Grimm Adventures of Billy and Mandy. It had this great, almost adult, sense of humor that made me feel like I was getting away with something every time I watched it. I think it’s great that I still get jazzed when I meet someone who created something from my childhood. After watching his animatic for Woof Woof Meow Meow, I became super disappointed that that never became a show. I would have watched the hell out of it.

    One more great thing about this seminar (besides the awesome inspiration) was the super helpful tips. It’s refreshing to hear someone literally recommend that you put “the minimum amount of work” into a pitch bible, since it stands in stark contrast to the general feeling that you have to constantly be working non-stop or no one will take you seriously. I also really appreciate the helpful advice of putting your work online so that studios can see that you’re able to successfully create things that piques people’s interest. But I think the best piece of advice he gave was that when you’re writing characters, you have to be able to empathize with all of them. Empathy is a thing that I think is severely lacking in some industries, so I’m glad to hear that it’s damn near a requirement in this one. I wish the whole world thought that way.

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  13. Something that hit close to home for me from Adam’s lecture was his description of what the animation industry demands in terms of drawing style. [Your drawing style] has to be messy, but not too messy and well drawn, but not too well drawn. This is something I‘ve observed since studying the portfolios of people in the animation industry, but the topic has never really been mentioned, so I assumed it was all in my head. It’s nice to have the confirmation that no, your own style won’t always cut it, they expect a certain art style that resembles the feeling of animation – which as Adam accurately put it, is messy, but not too messy.

    Along a similar line, something else I NEED to hold onto from Adam’s lecture is his conscious decision to simplify characters and designs. I think perhaps for people who have an extensive traditional drawing background (or maybe it’s just me), there’s a tendency to hold onto too much when animating, whether it be detail, quality of line work, etc. I now see it’s so essential to simplify. When Adam was discussing and showing examples of how he made Billy and Mandy simpler and easier to draw from his first animated school designs, I was so inspired to revisit my pervious projects at USC. Simplification will definitely be an element I hold onto for future projects.

    The words of wisdom Adam imparted on us all have been invaluable. From the fact that in TV your daily duties encompass so much more than your actual job title, to the simple idea that if you can entertain people without the industry’s help than they will more readily support you, to his Pitch Bible advise, there were so many elements to Adam’s lecture that are worth mentioning and remembering!

    Thank you so much Adam for an enthusiastic, but realistic perspective!

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  14. I think what I enjoyed the most from Adam’s presentation was seeing the development of his characters of “The Grimm Adventures of Billy and Mandy” come from his student film. It makes me think of what I would like to do for thesis and if there would be a chance of my characters and stories having some kind of appeal like Andy’s did. It was nice getting a refresher in the pitch process and having some more insight on what people like to see when they pitch and what they don’t like to see. His characters had a nice clean look, but unique style that caught the audience’s eye.

    The only thing I wish had a little more explanation was how much say and involvement you have in your project if it is picked up. How much control and input did he have in writing for the show, other character designs, that sort of thing. Also, I don’t think I caught the entire explanation of royalties you get from your show, but I think he said it wasn’t much or none at all. Is it like that only at Cartoon Network or is that the norm for all studios?

    In all, his presentation was very inspirational. I would really like to explore some of my ideas that I would like to pitch and really concentrate on character and story development for some of the ideas. I hope that he is able to succeed in all of his creative endeavors and I hope to see some more work from Adam soon 🙂

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    1. Hi Espy- You may want to consider taking Caroline Hu’s Masters Class. I believe she has students create pitch bibles and goes over all of the requirements.

      Royalties are a thorn in the side for creators and artists. It is hard to get a good deal on your first show. The studios usually retain all the rights. However, musicians and actors have a good union and they always receive royalties. (Not only in the US. That is why Norman McLaren used to create his own optical soundtrack- so he could receive royalties on Canadian Film Board films!) I know the writers guild has been trying to bring animation writers into the union, but it is complicated since many storyboard artists also write. As you can see this is a big topic!

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  15. After Tess’s lecture on being an independent animator, it was an interesting contrast hearing Adam talk about his career taking the more commercial route in television. Though some of my favorite TV shows have been animated (Spongebob Squarepants anyone?) I had never given much thought to what it might be like to work in that particular realm before Adam’s presentation. One of the things that really stuck with me was his comparison between creating content for TV vs feature films – with TV, episodes are made more quickly so there are more opportunities to generate new ideas and practice a variety of skills, whereas with feature films there’s more room to put love and care into your work. It was also neat learning about the evolution of cultures in different animation studios such as Cartoon Network, who were on board with Adam’s work in the past but today would probably call it not mom-friendly enough. Overall, Adam’s lecture made me curious to explore more about the business side of the animation world; I’ve always been more caught up in the creative side of things, but it would be wise to have more of an awareness about the state of the industry I’m getting myself into instead of feeling like I’m walking in with blurry vision. So far, the seminar class has been very helpful in growing my understanding.

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  16. Maxwell Atoms’ presentation reminded me both of the evolution of ideas for animation, and the business side of working in a corporate animation studio. As someone who watched The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy when I was younger, I was a both surprised and entertained at Billy and Mandy’s original conception. The evolution of Billy and Mandy from a 1950s style “overly enthusiastic” cartoon to something a bit more “grim” was something I had not considered. Indeed, Mandy’s original happy-go-lucky was amusing after first getting to know her as being a darker character on the television show.
    Business-wise, I learned from Maxwell Atoms that the television industry, as opposed to the feature film industry, seemed to allow more freedom to pursue one’s own works. However, it seemed to be more turbulent then the feature film industry, or at least according to his wording. Hearing that a few new “higher ups” at Cartoon Network had the bright idea to fire their animation department to try to latch onto the so-called trendy live action TV market left me flabbergasted. I had always wondered what had happened to my favorite cartoons on Cartoon Network and why they suddenly stopped, and now I had my answer. It was unfortunate, and goes to show that one must be prepared to adapt to an ever-changing animation business market.

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  17. Adam presentation was quite interesting for me specially I had a experience working for TV. I think his comedy and sense of storytelling is amazing. I watched that animatic and I thought to myself how could a studio turn down such a thing. The fact that he said about Cartoon Network was really disappointing this channel used to show many inspiring television shows and I learned a lot from them. Specially this is one of the few animation channels that broadcast worldwide. I used to wake up every morning and watch Cartoon Network when I was in Iran and now I hear that this network is not interested in making cartoon really shocked me. The most attractive part of the Adam’s presentation for me was that he said he was a shy person but he could manage to make his way to show business. As I am a shy person myself it was really important for me to know that they are other shy persons in this industry who are also successful.

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  18. What a seminar it was with full of positive energy! Adam Burton’s presentation was not only informative but also very inspiring. This industry, I say animation, is often seen(or consider?) as just a simple, happy, full of excitement, naïve, child-driven thing. But reality, it demands a lot of time, energy, labour, and passion – can be really rough and difficult. Therefore it was very happy, and inspiring to see the person who is in the industry for quite long time but still absolutely loves it. I felt so refreshed after his seminar, and recharged to make more stuffs!
    Moreover, I found this seminar was very informative too. Especially knowing the reality of pitch bibles, there’re always stacks of bibles piled up, is quite frightening (in a way) but very helpful to understand why bibles should be short and impactive.

    Thank you so much for coming and sharing your valuable experience and knowledge, I indeed enjoyed it (so much!!)

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  19. This time was full of enjoyment. Adam is not only a talented artist but also who develops his world no matter what. Apparent of Animation industry seems always bright and make happy stories for kids. However, it is not true according to his experience. Even though lt is tough working in animation industry, His characters and works are still attractive. I loved the first animation that he showed us at the beginning of the seminar. The gap between of characters and story made me get shocked. His sense of humor is well blended into story. I cannot say the animation is for kids but still we can enjoy his works. Since Adam has different style with Tess who was a speaker from the last seminar, I could experience the present of animation industry through his lecture. I want to say thank you for sharing your great works. I am looking forward to see your next project.

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  20. How pleasure journey this seminar is. I have watched many films from Cartoon Network before and this time we can watch someone part of them to talk his story face to face,It is so exciting. I love the storyboard so much. The plot, character design, performance and sound of it are all greatly built. it is so hard to believe why the storyboard finally do not be fully made as a film. I believe many people will lenjoy the movie as much as I do .Also,I think it is a good course for inspiring me many about character animation, and I believe it will help me lot for the Fundamental of animation course for building my own character’s figure, personality also how it moves. Moreover, I always think making people laugh is hard but very meaningful thing, which is always well done in cartoon style. When making my own animation I usually try to make thing kind serious and now I want to try this kind style and the film showed by is a good reference for men to start it also. Many thanks for sharing!

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  21. I grew up watching Cartoon Network as a kid and Adam’s work, The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, is always on the top of my favorite shows list. Having an opportunity to be given a lecture by the show’s creator himself made me feel really nostalgic and inspired. I also interested in working as a story artist and I found that this lecture is very helpful in order to continue on this path. I admire his sense of humor and I really appreciate all the fun that he put in his shows. I think one of the most important keys to make the show successful is to have fun making it and we can really see through Adam’s works that he loves his stories, he loves his characters and he enjoys working on them. We saw how he developed his student project into one of the most successful shows that are loved by so many kids.
    Further more, I really appreciate the lecture that he gave about creating a bible for the pitching project and I really want to learn more about it. The lecture gave me a clearer idea of how to keep it short but effective.
    It was great. I would like to thanks Adam for the inspiring lecture and for being a part that made my childhood wonderful.

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  22. I thoroughly enjoyed Adam’s lecture. What amazes me again and again about so many successful people working in the entertainment field is their willpower and drive to not give up. Not only did Adam give many good tips and insights about working in the industry, he also showed us how one needs to persevere while developing his/her career. Time after time Adam mentioned how he bravely and continuously pitched ideas to people until one stuck. That attitude created the show Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy which has become one of the most popular kid cartoons. Although the direction of my interests and Adam’s expertise are not the same, his career story was very special for me. When I first discovered my animation interests, I always wanted to enter the industry and work on feature films. But after receiving a bachelor degree in Fine Arts and continuing my studies at USC, I begin to wonder whether I want to go into the industry. Adam’s story of jumping from one company to another to work on different tv series and finally deciding to come out of industry to work on his own film encourages me to explore alternative possibilities. Perhaps I will experiment more in research labs and create smaller original works.

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  23. Thanks for Adam’s presentation. I really love Billy and Mandy, I love all the characters because they feel so real. The animation is dark at some moments and cute or funny at a lot of parts. The jokes are fresh and original unlike the other cartoons. And shows life on a different perspective as well as fear and depression.
    Billy and Mandy really pushed some limits in its time, like some of the jokes and sociopathic behavior. I think Maxwell mentioned something that really important to animators, which is be true to the emotional viewpoint of a character. Having a relatable emotional connection with the audience. Sometimes people look for that in friends and characters they can relate to. And is also nice to hear his experience working with television show, he also mentioned his pitch process, I really appreciate Adam’s passion to animation and I wish to see his new film soon!

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  24. Adam’s lecture was a very fun look into the life of a tv animator. I found Adam to be very entertaining, with some great insight into TV animation. This was interesting to me because TV animation seems so different from feature. I found it very endearing how much Adam preferred tv animation to feature due to the constant change and fast pace. This is somewhat refreshing because so many animators seem to want the prestige and slower pace of a feature. Yet it’s hard not to forget how works like UPA’s or Ren and Stimpy made such big impacts on animation. I think TV animation has had a huge cultural impact that is sometimes overlooked because of its time limits and therefore limited animation style. Adam’s positivity and willingness to go with the flow of the changing industry was very inspiring. I learned a lot about how a career in TV animation might look, while also getting small insights on things like how to make a pitch bible.

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  25. Coming from a fine art background, the business behind animation is still relatively new to me. I remember a number of the cartoons discussed and got such a kick out of learning about the behind-the-scenes adult world that made it all possible. I love how connected he is with his memories of childhood; I feel like connections like that make art all the more powerful.

    I thought it was interesting that Adam mentioned Cartoon Network being “aged down” since his time. While I’m not very well-versed in the programs currently on CN, I am very familiar with Adventure Time and Steven Universe and would not lump those shows into the category of being aged down. I also thought it was interesting that Adam said animators hopped back and forth between cartoons aimed at kids and adults. Everywhere else in the world there seems to be a great big cultural barrier between children and adults, so I find it liberating to know that there’s a lot of overlap when it comes to the production of content. Adam’s lecture made me realize how interested I am in the subject of age and cultural concepts of maturity. I also find myself thinking about this one Maurice Sendak quote: “There’s something in this country that is so opposed to understanding the complexity of children.”

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  26. Adam gave us a really funny presentation. His speech was refining and informative. I really like his animatic storyboard he showed to us. His ability of using timing and space exactly to convey what he want us to know. He is very professional on how to create a funny story. Sometimes I find there was a big difference of humor around people under different culture. So there is a risk for filmmaker to create a new humor project suits everybody- people always create things unconsciously with their cultural habit. That’s happened a lot when I go to a cinema to watch a comedy movie, I always find local audience laughing more than us who come from other districts. Although the language should a part of reason. In Adam’s film, I could get all humor point like other local classmates did. That was very important for a filmmaker. I had learned a lot. Thanks Adam! Really looking forward to see your next project!

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  27. I love Adam’s presentation . I found Adam to be very funny and entertaining, with some great insight into TV animation. This was interesting to me because TV animation seems so different from feature. And he also mentioned some interesting point of view of being a animator , having a relatable emotional connection with the audience is so important. No matter it was TV show or feature. Billy and Mandy is one of my favorite shows in Cartoon Network, so does The Fish Hooks! I also enjoyed watching the animatic storyboard he showed to us.
    Really looking forward to see Adam’s future works

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  28. Adams presentation is awesome! It’s fortunate that I can have chance to hear everything about his career and see his creations. I love his great sense of humor and interesting designs of characters. Especially for the idea of stop motion piece, he collected toys from his childhood and assembled them into new imaginary settings. All these details in the miniature world are fascinating and very inspiring. I wish one day I can see that piece on screens. Besides, he shared some practical dimensions about animation production. He showed us how to make everything easier to adjust and draw because it will never have enough time to draw. So he took character Mandy as an example and showed us the sketches. Animators always need to keep a balance between time and quality. Under limited time, it is the most important thing to consider how to reach the best quality, effects and translate ideation efficaciously to audiences. In hence, I totally agreed with what he said that strong empathy can really trigger creator and leader to think, communicate and express.

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  29. I was so excited to see Maxwell Atoms, Billy and Mandy is one of my favorite TV show from Cartoon Network. I used to watch them everyday in Hawaii, when I was a kid.
    It was surprising that himself is charming and funny as the TVshow, and it was also interesting that he mentioned about the restriction of the depiction of children show. Unlike the TV show “Invader Zim”, I felt the creators of Billy and Mandy and Con Carne are enjoying creating bizarre and grotesque representation in children’s show under the regulation.
    I think I like the show because they never be hypocrisy. But all the characters are so pure, charming and some point they are sweet.
    And it was so inspiring to hear his experiences and how his long term project became into TVshow.

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  30. This seminar was given me a deep impress. I like this style of cartoon animation. Because make this kind of animation can always give many people good mood. Bring happiness to everyone is a holy things. He sheared his experience and his opinion of animation with us. With his vividly describe of her experience, I got a lot of inspiration. One of the most impressive things for me is his interesting storyboard. The story is really conceptive that give us many surprise. And this kind of animation style is popular in the market now. At last, thanks for sharing!

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  31. Adam‘s presentation is amazing! His presentation was inspired and informative. I really like the animatic storyboard he showed us.Beside, I really admire his sense of humor moreover, I also appreciate all the humor that he convey in his storyboards, I got a lot of inspiration from that. Timing spacing and continuity works so well in his boards. Another thing that he mentioned which resonated me a lot is that maintaining a relatable emotional connection with the audience, which is a perfect way to make characters convincing and triggers audiences. The detailed miniature he showed us is super stunning. I wish one day I could see that on big screen. Thanks for sharing!

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  32. The arrival of Maxwell Atoms let me excited, when I first learned that he had previously participated in the “Cow and Chicken” creation, let me recall that my memory of this show, even though I has not watch the The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy”and“Evil Con Carne”, but when he shows us the early work design, I am for sure that, we are in same group of people, we are all in love with “classic Cartoon Network style ” . His story board and Animatic are very exciting, I can see that he has a very good quality of the creative. His new work “Dead Meat” shows him in the field of new style to try, new media new art style and new story, he will never stop his progress.

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  33. Maxwell Atoms is really the most interesting guy I ever met. And the speech he brought us today was really inspiring and informative. I thing the charming in his work is coming from his humor. Billy and Mandy is my favorite show in cartoon networks. Look forward to seeing his future works with new media and new artistic style.
    Thanks for sharing!

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